Workflow and content management system @World Leading Asset Management company

Client: World Leading Asset Management company

Timeline: 2 months, 2019

Team: 5 Designers

My role: Product Design, Service Design, Interaction Design (low-fi to high-fi), Clickable Prototype, Testing Plan

Tools: Sketch, InVision, Keynote, Illustrator, Personas, User Journey, Systems Design, Stakeholder Map


CHALLENGE

  • Improve current approach to Customer Relationship Management
  • Understand needs across B2B2C value chain and develop an innovative suite of services
  • Deliver more centralised, personalised and responsive content management system at a strategic and transactional level

OUTCOME

Workflow and contents managements system “Spectrum” is a Marketing and Sales Workbench for the wholesale market, integrated with current capabilities of a new in-house platform called Spectrum. Spectrum pools together apps and tools in one dashboard.

Key features:

  • Integrated Client and Contact categorisation within dashboards
  • Integrated tailoring content capabilities
  • Exploiting Business Intelligence
  • Simpler and automated processes to align marketing and sales more effectively

CONTEXT

This project is a collaboration between a World Leading Asset Management company [NDA] Marketing Team and the Royal College of Art and Design, looking at how to improve the current approach to Customer Relationship Management for the wholesale division across Europe.

RESEARCH

Current capabilities of Spectrum

Spectrum is an in-house User Interface which is led by the Client Experience Team to streamline and automate the workflows in one centralised system for those in the Institutional Division.

Currently, Spectrum has not been designed for Marketing as well as the Wholesale Market but there is an opportunity to leverage the data and the centralisation of this new system for client profiling, and content personalisation.

Tools and software research

We took inspirations of the best softwares that organise, track, and manage tasks, simplify team-based work management. They all Trello, Asana and Jira have a board with an overview of all tasks with some key information and a more detailed view when you click task.

We also received inspiration from companies that have already started personalising content. This was to understand the feasibility of our tailoring content and weather we could find some interesting solutions to personalisation.

Current process flow

We have understood and visualised how the actual process flow looks like.

Opportunity

How might we help the Asset Management company better understand and engage with their wholesale clients and contacts, so that they can provide relevant, insightful, proactive and responsive information?

Personas

Both, Sarah who represents Marketing department and John who represents Sales are based on real people working in that Asset Management company. It helped us to have real users in mind during the whole design process.

DESIGN PROCESS

Interface brainstorming

Due to difficulties with gaining access to the existing version of Spectrum, we only had a couple of screenshots to guide our design. Moreover, all 5 of us in the team are UX/UI Designers with our own styles and ways of thinking.

We have decided to start with some brainstorming sessions, all of us were individually making few minutes sketches of the main dashboard. It helped us to discuss high-level design decision and have a starting point.

Concept development

After that, we discussed a digital platform structure, its pages hierarchy and content.

Low-fidelity design

Pages were divided between us and we started designing interfaces in low-fidelity. It was challenging to keep similar logic and functionality. We were regulary discussing the progress and iterating on our designs.

Wireframes user flow

At the same time, we were building a user flow map to design the user experience and see the big picture.

PROJECT OUTCOME

Workflow and contents managements system “Spectrum” is a Marketing and Sales Workbench for the wholesale market, integrated with current capabilities of a new in-house platform called Spectrum. Spectrum pools together apps and tools in one dashboard.

Key features:

  • Integrated Client and Contact categorisation within dashboards
  • Integrated tailoring content capabilities
  • Exploiting Business Intelligence
  • Simpler and automated processes to align marketing and sales more effectively

Visual design

We started to build a design system with a layout and components that will be consistent on all our interfaces design.

High-fidelity design

The customised Dashboards helps optimise their day-to-day activities for both Marketing and Sales. They no longer have to “feed the beast” as Spectrum pools together the various CRM systems and tools needed.

The integration of the Client and Contact categorisation proves collaboration so they can work more efficiently towards shared goals.

Integration of smarter data analytics and Business Intelligence helps Marketing and Sales in creating new client opportunities, both across sales and business development.

Information personalisation helps deliver relevant, insightful and responsive data information to respective clients.

Healthtech and food retail innovation @CERN

Client: CERN

Timeline: 1 month, 2019

Team: 4 Designers

My role: UX Research, Product and Service Design, Visual Design, Facilitated teamwork

Tools: Sketch, Illustrator, Photoshop, Interviews, Personas, User Journey, Stakeholder Map, Ecosystem Map


Our project has been awarded as a winning project in a Grand Challenge RCAxCERN competition (among 74 teams, 374 students from across the School of Design) and we have presented the idea in CERN in Geneva.

CHALLENGE

  • More than 50% of the world lives with preventable chronic diseases
  • 75% of all healthcare in the UK costs stem from chronic diseases, such as diabetes
  • In 25 years, a number of people with diabetes is expected to double up

OUTCOME

Healthtech and food retail innovation “Knowtrition” is a preventive healthtech system designed for people who aim to maintain a well-balanced diet routine, in order to prevent potential chronic diseases in the future.


CONTEXT

The Grand Challenge competition is a collaboration between Royal College of Art students (74 teams, 374 students from across the School of Design) and CERN in Switzerland, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics – birthplace of the World Wide Web and the Large Hadron Collider. Together we were examining how innovative and disruptive technologies can help address the world’s most intractable challenges, by design.

Our project topic was in Health and Wellbeing: “The changing model of delivery for healthcare, enabled by big data, AI and machine learning, as well as the contribution of technology to medical research.” We were working in a Double Diamond model, every week was a new phase: Discover, Define, Develop, Deliver.

RESEARCH

Understanding the landscape

We started with conducting the research into the current state of healthcare market. Then, we wrote all important insights and trends that we have discovered and clustered them on the wall. The initial research resulted in the pictured below.

Potential of intervention

We concluded that the prediagnosis and prevention stages of disease developments are the most interesting to us, as they have the biggest impact.

The problem

More than 50% of the world lives with chronic diseases. 75% of all healthcare costs stem from preventable chronic diseases, such as diabetes.

Worldwide, the prevalence of Type II Diabetes is increasing rapidly. In 2015, 415 million adults globally had the condition and it is expected that prevalence will rise up to 642 million cases by 2040.

Opportunity

How might we prevent people who have urban lifestyle from Type II Diabetes and other chronic diseases?

A healthy, balanced diet is the most important factor to prevent Type II Diabetes and other chronic diseases. We identified food shopping as a decision making point. The selection of food products we buy in a supermarket determinates what we eat later at home.

Interviews and insights

We have done in depth interviews with various people based in London. We wanted to understand batter what are their food shopping habits and patterns.

DESIGN PROCESS

Ideation

Based on the user journey we have done after interviews we have start ideating. Crazy 8 was a great tool to get quickly some ideas. Later on we have developed some ideas further to see which one will be the best.

Prototype

We build prototypes and test them in the field.

PROJECT OUTCOME

Healthtech and food retail innovation “Knowtrition” is a preventive healthtech system designed for people who aim to maintain a well-balanced diet routine, in order to prevent potential chronic diseases in the future.

This consists of a scanner in a form of transformable bag made of bioplastic which is biodegradable; a skin patch that monitors nutrition data in the body and displays a real-time information of the food; and an app that calculates nutritional needs of the user based on food purchasing history and health data, as well as generating a personalised products suggestion.

Virtual Reality game with a robotic arm @Polidea

Client: Polidea

Timeline: 4 months, 2018

Team: UX Designer, VR Designer, Engineers, Project Manager, Product Owner

My role: Product Design, UX/UI Design (low fi to high fi), Prototyping, User Testing

Tools: Sketch, Unity, Photoshop, Illustrator, Zeplin, Jira


CHALLENGE

  • Virtual Reality experience to inspire clients
  • Synchronise with a robotic arm in real-time
  • Through VR game deliver an entertainment during an upcoming conference

OUTCOME

Virtual Reality game with a robotic arm “Sort-it VR” is designed exclusively for the MCE 2018 Redefining Tech international conference. The aim of the game is to gain as many points as possible under time pressure by sorting objects on the assembly line.


CONTEXT

When I was working at a software company Polidea, the aim of our interdisciplinary team (1 UX Designer, 1 VR Designer, 1 VR Engineer, 1 Robotic Arm Engineer, 1 Product Manager, 1 Product Owner) was to build a Virtual Reality game that can inspire clients. At the same time, it was supposed to be an entertainment experience to be launched at the MCE Redefining Tech 2018 international conference. Moreover, the VR experience was supposed to by synchronised with the Robotic Arm in real-time.

RESEARCH

At the beginning, we wanted to understand Virtual Reality better and also get some inspirations for our idea. We were researching different kind of Experiences in VR, business cases and games. Also, how it applied in various industries. We have also checked what are the possibilities and examples of a Robotic Arm applications.

DESIGN PROCESS

Concept Brainstorming

With the aim of providing business and entertainment value, and referencing the blocks concept from the conference visual materials in mind, we settled on Sorting objects on the assembly line idea.

Visual Design

In order to maintain consistency with MCE conference colourful blocks, from its Visual Identity, we kept the similar colour palette for our visual language. Furthermore, we created a Moodboard inspired by Environment design.

Gameplay Flow

We made a User Flow diagram of the whole VR Experience to see the logic and all interactions that we need to design. We iterated and developed it further as the project progressed.

User Journey with Interactions

While working on designing User Interactions in, new to me in 3D, I came up with the below tool to help me visualise them on the paper. Once generalised to a template, I made VR storyboard with all necessary interactions representing the User Journey in our game.

Environment Design

The VR environment – a spacious factory has been imported to Unity3D and redesigned to get the visual style from the moodboard.

Low-fidelity Interface Design

In the VR environment, we considered interfaces attached to different points in the space, such as the controllers, in-game objects or above them, in front of the user, or hints somewhere in the space. Also, there might appear and disappear in various moments, it depends on the individual user flow.

This is why, using a flowchart to visualise the flow of some basic interfaces, often grouping them and adding comments related to interactions, turned out to be the best solution. I have also experimented with 3D mockups but it was not as effective.

High-fidelity Interface Design

Originally, I designed them as 2D interfaces in Sketch, and later learned how to build them as 3D objects in Unity, so that a VR Engineer could easily add a code to objects in the VR environment.

I worked on separate branches which might be integrated in Unity by an engineer later. He taught me how to add some simple interactions necessary for our game and would follow with building more complicated ones himself.

Interaction Design

In the Sort-it VR, there are different kind of interactions. Firstly, there is a Tutorial to quickly teach the user how to play the game. Secondly, there are dynamic interfaces with explanations and practical exercises.

VR interaction design poses many challenges, some of which I encountered while trying to answer these questions: 1.How users should click buttons on the flat interface (laser beam interaction or more like a physical touch pad interaction), 2. What distance from the user and hight the flat interface should have, 3. How to use controllers to catch objects in the game, 4. How an on-hand tutorial should look like and where it should be, 5. How score points should be presented and where should they appear.

Prototyping and Testing

Interactions have been prototyped and tested with users to find out the most intuitive and suitable UX solutions for the game.

Robotic Arm

I was supposed to design a Robotic Arm choreography that was to be an attraction for the observers. The choreography was synchronised with the user’s movements in VR.

A Robotic Arm has a choreography while counting down until the game begins and ends. Also every time when a user throws a special MCE block into the MCE board in front of them, a Robot takes a physical MCE  block and puts it into the same place on the physical MCE board/shelf.

In case of any errors with the Robotic Arm during the gameplay, I have designed info graphics that will appear on the screen, so that the monitoring staff fixes the problem.

PROJECT OUTCOME

VR game with a robotic arm “Sort-it VR” is designed exclusively for the MCE 2018 Redefining Tech international conference. The aim of the game is to gain as many points as possible under time pressure by sorting objects on the assembly line.

Stand at the MCA 2018 conference

The conference took place in the Palace of Culture and Science in Warsaw. A building wing housed the VR Space that included a Stand with our project: a user in VR and a Robotic Arm with other objects that it interacts with its choreography.

Personal money management coach @Lloyds Banking Group

Client: Lloyds Banking Group

Timeline: 3 months, 2019

Team: 5 Designers

My role: UX Research, Service Design, Workshop facilitation

Tools: Interviews, Ethnographic research, Personas, Co-creation workshop, User Journey, Service Blue print


CHALLENGE

  • Reimagine a bank branch experience in 2019
  • Becoming financially independent requires financial literacy
  • Empower branches to improve people’s money managements and reduce financial worries

OUTCOME

Personal money management coach “Fincoach” is system that aims to improve the financial literacy through behaviour change, executive attention, goal setting and progress monitoring.


Our group won the 1st prize at the internal Design Hackathon RCA x Lloyds Bank.

A short story captured by Lloyds Banking Group about our collaboration:


CONTEXT

Lloyds Banking Group is the largest bank in the UK with over 30m customers. Part of their services is delivered through their network of branches. The branch role is unclear in 2019 due to shifts in customer behaviour resulting in more core banking activities shifting to online tools. However, many customers still value in-person services, either because they do not have access to digital and/or they prefer face-to-face communication. Our brief was to re-imagine what a bank branch should be and do in 2019. This project is a good example of a Double Dimond design process which I follow in many of my projects.

DISCOVER

User and Field Research

We conducted a broad desk and field research, going to 10 Lloyds Banking Group branches and its competitors. We did 25 in-depth interviews with the bank customers, employees and other stakeholders.

We wanted to understand better people’s relationship with money.

We identified potential user groups and analysed their key financial activities that present opportunities. Based on interviews we compared their financial literacy, digital skills and goal orientation.

Examining all important moments in a customer’s life cycle helped us to define the key transition which happens when one becomes financially independent. At that point an individual requires financial literacy that they often lack.

DEFINE

User Personas

Creating personas allowed us to organise the knowledge we gained from user interviews and decide what kind of people we want to focus on.

Current Channels and Resources

We visualised how customers solve a problem now while seeking for a financial advise. What are the strengths and drawbacks of these channels or resources.

Insights

We selected the four most important insights that became drivers for our project.

Key Personas

Then, the key personas for our project crystallised.

Opportunity

How might we empower the bank branch to improve people’s money management and reduce financial worries?

DEVELOP

Workshop

We conducted a workshop for 7 participants to explore people’s relationship with money. Earlier we prepared some materials and tools that would help us to learn from participants what their financial challenges are and which channels they use most often. We also used this opportunity to co-create new service ideas.

PROJECT OUTCOME

Personal money management coach “Fincoach” is system that aims to improve the financial literacy through behaviour change, executive attention, goal setting and progress monitoring.

Service User Journey and Blueprint

DELIVER

Prototyping and Testing

We tested with people a few elements of the service and interactions, such as: how they perceive the service in the first place, how to make users more comfortable, how to keep them coming back. To achieve this, we prototyped a Fincoach attitude, a Fincoach’s office and different ways of information sharing.

Users Feedback

Business Analysis

Roadmap

Design System accessibility guidelines @Medidata

Client: Medidata Solutions

Timeline: 3 months internship, 2019

Team: Individual project

My role: UX Research, UX/UI Design, Clickable prototype

Tools: Sketch, InVision, Interviews, Survey


CHALLENGE

  • Users experience situational disabilities (ex clinicians working in travel)
  • Make Medidata products more accessible
  • Solve for one, extend to many (by improving experience of permanent visually impaired users’ we also improve the experience of other users)

OUTCOME

I designed accessibility UX/UI guidelines to be integrated with the existing Medidata Design System to help Designers, Developers and Testers create products that are accessible for people with permanent disabilities but also improve the experience of other users. (a clickable prototype below)


CONTEXT

The main focus of my summer internship in Medidata, was an indvidual project which was supposed to be related to accessibility. It was an independent work, from creating a project brief, making a project schedule to execution and prototyping. I will explain the project in details further on this page. During the internship, I was also involved in a group project, in collaboration with engineering, testing and marketing interns, focusing on the future of healthcare and decreasing environmental impact through Virtual Clinical Trial.

RESEARCH

Discovery of accessibility

Accessibility is the quality that makes an experience open to all. Disability can affect different senses – touch, visual or hearing – or affect speaking; furthermore, it can be temporal or situational. The latter, situational, can affect anyone.

Digital accessibility

It means building a digital content and applications to used by people with disabilities. It can apply to websites, mobile apps, despot apps, electronic documents and more. Many of us experience situational disabilities, such us: buttons on the screen are too small and difficult to click, low colour contrast on the interface difficult to read or choose a button (especially if the screen reflects the light) and many more.

Medidata’s products users, Clinical Trials Researchers or Doctors, often work while traveling from one site to another and experience a lot of situational disabilities. This is why, when designing a digital content, we should consider making it accessible for everyone, accommodating for non-ideal environments.

Define a project focus

In my project, I decided to focus on vision disabilities, because they can be solved with the user interface design. What I knew is that people with permanent visual impairments, such as low vision, or deficiencies, such as colour blindness, struggle to use digital products and platforms that are inaccessible. My assumption was that making a digital products and platforms accessible will improve not only permanent visually impaired users’ but everyones’ experience.

Survey Design

To better understand users’ digital experience, I prepared a survey titled “Your experience in Digital world” for Medidata UK office employees. Given, the constrained time of my internship, we could not reach out to clients and it was the quickest and easiest way to get a feedback about various digital products and platforms. 

The aims of the survey were: to validate the assumption that you do not have to be permanently disabled to find accessibility features helpful in some situations and that even in Medidata we have users with special needs or habits; to find out the most common struggles/habits/preferences/needs and which accessibility features people find the most useful/necessary.

Survey Analysis

In the diagram there are 4 habits and preferences that are the most common (more than 50% people have it).

People who are not disable still use some accessibility features, just to make their life easier. It is interesting that more than 50%(!) of people use Dark Screen Mode, so maybe it is worth to consider it while designing interfaces?

I found out which visual, cognitive, functional struggles people have and selected these, that are low hanging fruit to implement and good to start with:

After that, I realised that new guidelines need to be designed in order to apply these accessibilitiy improvements.

DESIGN PROCESS

Developing guidelines

After the discovery phase, I decided to create Accessibility guidelines for Medidata UX/UI Design, that might be integrated with Medidata Design System later on. I reviewed many trusted sources with accessibility guidelines in order to get some knowledge and inspirations, such as: UK Gov WCAG, IBM Accessibility check list, Google Material Design, Apple Guidelines, Microsoft Inclusive Design, BBC Accessibility and many more.

Then, I made an audit of the Medidata product I had an access to, in order to have a context for my design. After that, I analysed exciting Medidata Design System &UI Kit to see where and how I can add a value. Later, I chose the most important categories where accessibility guidelines should be added and prioritised them. When they were ready, I started making a content draft for each category (the accessibility guidelines content was based on the initial research I have done). Finally, I could apply the existing Medidata Design System UI style to keep consistent and easy to integrate. To make it clear how it works when integrated, I did a clickable prototype in inVision (attached on the top of the page).

PROJECT OUTCOME

I designed accessibility UX/UI guidelines to be integrated with the existing Medidata Design System to help Designers, Developers and Testers create products that are accessible for people with permanent disabilities but also improve the experience of other users. (a clickable prototype below)

Guidelines structure

Categories from the Medidata Design System that I chose to start with are: Colour, Typography, Buttons, Links, Page Header. These are the ones that people struggle with in some situations if they are not designed properly (as validated in the survey). Also these improvements will be easy to implement and will be a “quick win”, good to start with.

Each page starts with some key information in “In a nutshell” section at the top. Then, there is a “Context” section with the reasons for its importance and an example situations. Below, there are “Guidelines” and “Examples” sections, if possible, both for Designers and Developers/Testers. At the end, there is “Test” section with the Procedure and Expected Result.

Platform for organisational growth @ThoughtWorks

Client: ThoughtWorks

Timeline: 3 months, 2019

Team: 5 Designers

My role: UX Research, Product and Service Design, UX/UI (low fi to help storytelling), Logo Design, Strategic Design, Prototyping and Testing

Tools: Sketch, Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, Interviews, Personas, User Journey, User Scenarios


CHALLENGE

  • Reimagine a future of consulting
  • Understand a landscape, consultancy as a hospital analogy
  • Bottom up vs Top down growth
  • Meaning and purpose in work

OUTCOME

Platform for an organisational growth “Roobiks” is an employee management system for consultancies. It helps align employees’ individual growth and the organisations growth. The platform currently consists of an expectation management and staffing feature.


CONTEXT

A project in collaboration with ThoughtWorks UK to reimagine how their consulting services might be shaped to meet new challenges in both the markets they operate and ways they want to work.

Methodology: Sprints

During this project we wanted to experiment with a methodology to execute a project of this complexity and magnitude in the best way possible. That is why, we adopted ThoughtWorks’s agile way of working and run this project in sprints. Instead of having a Double Diamond design process across the whole project, we made a Double Diamond each sprint.

An example of a plan for a week is: Monday – Discover (share and map research), Tuesday – Define (ideate and decide), Wednesday – Develop (develop the idea), Thursday – Validate (prototype and test), Friday – Sum up (reflect and plan next sprint).

BEFORE SPRINTS

Future trends

We dived into consultancy ecosystem and through our research detected key trends that we believe would impact the future of professional services. 

Consultancy landscape – Hospital analogy

We used a hospital analogy to help us better understand the consultancy landscape. Then it also helped us figure out how ThoughtWorks could grow.

When a Patient (Client) is sick, he would usually go seek advice from a General Practitioner (Management Consultancy). The GP would then diagnose his symptoms and a Prescription (Strategy) that he could take. If the problem is severe and can not be dealt with it on his own, he would then seek help from a Specialist (such as ThoughtWorks).

Major management consultancies are trying to own the whole chain by building Hospitals (complete capabilities from strategy to solution). How then could a specialist like ThoughtWorks compete in this landscape?

Understand the DNA

We wanted to learn more about ThoughtWorks and what growth means to them. We did two exercises: First, was as a measurement. There were 6 factors, such as specialist and generalist, and they had to mark where they were and where they wanted to be. Second one, was an animal association, in which we learned more about what was important to them, their values, such as collaboration. With that we came up with an analogy that helped understand the landscape and growth.

Bottom up vs Top down growth

When an individual grows, the company organically growths – it is a bottom up growth. However, a company could also just grow with its employees lagging behind – which is a top down. We have identified that bottom up growth is the more sustainable way to grow and develop new capabilities and service offerings within an organisation as opposed to top down growth led by the senior management.

Sprints planning

We prioritised the three main elements of a typical consultancy system to explore during sprints: Research&Innovation, People Management, Service Models. We ran sprints across these three buckets and explored some multiple concepts within each.

SPRINTS

We ran three sprints during the project. Below, there are links to learn more about each sprint design process.

Sprint 1 – Research & Innovation

Sprint 2 – People Management

Sprint 3 – Service Models

AFTER SPRINTS

A fresh start

Having all the experience and knowledge after 3 sprints, we were overloaded with the information. We realised we have to start with a blank sheet of paper to extract what is really relevant and important for developing the final solution. We sat in a white wall, empty room and wrote down concisely: a vision, a strategy and principles. We also did a simplified user journey to see where are the best opportunities.

Developing a final idea

Crazy 8 exercise helped to warm up our creative brains. We decided it should be an internal digital/physical service. Later, everyone developed a concept idividually to see others perspectives.

PROJECT OUTCOME

Platform for an organisational growth “Roobiks” is an employee management system for consultancies. It helps align employees’ individual growth and the organisations growth. The platform currently consists of an expectation management and staffing feature.

Measurement metrics

These are a few key metrics we thought of to evaluate the success of our proposition.

Growth strategy

We are envisioning the capability growth (in-house capability building and hiring) curve to slow down after a while once the current aggressive hiring stage is over. For employee satisfaction we will need some time for the interests to feed into the demands team to actually have an effect on the projects that they recruit. Once that stage is over we expect a stiff growth curve as employees are getting the projects they want. For revenue we are expecting a slow growth at the beginning as investment will be needed for hiring new employees and also learning projects. Then once the capabilities are built we expect a faster growth in revenue as well.

Growth matrix

With Roobiks we can grow more surgeons with same expertise. Then train the new surgeons with different expertise or come up with new services. Roobiks is enabling ThoughtWorks to grow in the bottom right quadrant, making them capable of entering a new market, come up with new products or eventually enter new markets with new products. On the viability side we explored “post care” as a potential new service offering which is relatively easy to offer to cushion overall revenue as more challenging capabilities are being build in the meantime.

What does growth look like for your organisation?